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Product Description

“The book you hold in your hands is the distillate of a quarter century’s teaching. It is my attempt to answer, ‘What next?’ for students who are embarking on their ‘second act.’”
—Julia Cameron
 
Julia Cameron has inspired millions with her bestseller on creativity,  The Artist’s Way. In  It’s Never Too Late To Begin Again, she turns her eye to a segment of the population that, ironically, while they have more time to be creative, are often reluctant or intimidated by the creative process. Cameron shows readers that retirement can, in fact, be the most rich, fulfilling, and creative time of their lives.

When someone retires, the newfound freedom can be quite exciting, but also daunting. The life that someone had has changed, and the life to come is yet to be defined. In this book, Cameron shows readers how cultivating their creative selves can help them navigate this new terrain. She tells the inspiring stories of retirees who discovered new artistic pursuits and passions that more than filled their days—they nurtured their souls.  

This twelve-week course aimed at defining—and creating—the life you want to have as you redefine and re-create yourself, this book includes simple tools that will guide and inspire you to make the most of this time in your life:

-  Memoir writing offers an opportunity to reflect on and honor past experience. This book guides you through the daunting task of writing an entire memoir, breaking it down into manageable pieces. 
-  Morning Pages—private, stream-of-consciousness writing done daily—allow you to express wishes, fears, delights, resentments, and joys, which in turn, provide focus and clarity for the day at hand.
-  Artist Dates encourage fun and spontaneity.
-  Solo Walks quell anxiety and clear the mind.

This fun, gentle, step-by-step process will help you explore your creative dreams, wishes, and desires...and help you quickly find that it’s never too late to begin again.

Review

"Cameron. . . stands as living proof that a lifelong quest for expressing one''s self can be rewarding. . . . a must-read for all hoping to enhance their creativity in all aspects of life."
—Booklist

Praise for The Artist''s Way:
"If you have always wanted to pursue a creative dream, have always wanted to play and create with words or paints, this book will gently get you started and help you learn all kinds of paying-attention techniques; and that, after all, is what being an artist is all about. It''s about learning to pay attention."
--Anne Lamott

About the Author

Julia Cameron has been an active artist for more than three decades. She is the author of more than forty books, including such bestselling works on the creative process as  The Artist''s WayWalking in This World, and  Finding Water.
 
Emma Lively is a classical violist turned writer, composer, and lyricist working in musical theater and animation. She has served as Julia Cameron’s business manager for a decade.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction
 
Twenty-five years ago I wrote a book on creativity called The Artist’s Way. It spelled out, in a step-by-step fashion, just what a person could do to recover—and exercise—their creativity. I often called that book “The Bridge” because it allowed people to move from the shore of their constrictions and fears to the promised land of deeply fulfilling creativity. The Artist’s Way was used by people of all ages, but I found my just-retired students the most poignant. I sensed in them a particular problem set that came with maturity. Over the years, many of them asked me for help dealing with issues specific to transitioning out of the work force. The book you hold in your hands is the distillate of a quarter century’s teaching. It is my attempt to answer, “What next?” for students who are embarking on their “second act.” In this book you will find the common problems facing the newly retired: too much time, lack of structure, a sense that our physical surroundings suddenly seem outdated, excitement about the future coupled with a palpable fear of the unknown. As a friend of mine worried recently, “All I do is work. When I stop working, will I do . . . nothing?”
 
The answer is no. You will not do “nothing.” You will do many things. You will be surprised and delighted by the well of colorful inspiration that lies within you—a well that you alone can tap. You will discover that you are not alone in your desires, and that there are creativity tools that can help you navigate the specific issues of retirement. Those who worked the Artist’s Way will find some of the tools familiar. Other tools are new, or their use is innovative. This book attempts to address many taboo subjects for the newly retired: boredom, giddiness, a sense of being untethered, irritability, excitement, and depression, to name just a few. It seeks to give its practitioners a simple set of tools that, used in combination, will trigger a creative rebirth. It attempts to prove that everyone is creative—and that it is never too late to explore your creativity.
 
When my father entered retirement after a busy and successful thirty- five years as an account executive in advertising, he turned to nature. He acquired a black Scottie dog named Blue that he took for long, daily walks. He also acquired a pair of birding binoculars and found that the hourly tally of winged friends brought him wonder and joy. He spotted finches, juncos, chickadees, wrens, and more exotic visitors, like egrets. He lived half the year on a sailboat in Florida and half the year just outside of Chicago. He enjoyed the differing bird populations and was enchanted by their antics. When it got too dangerous for him to live alone on his boat, he moved to the north permanently, settling into a small cottage on a lagoon. There he spotted cardinals, tanagers, blue jays, owls, and the occasional hawk. When I would visit him, he would share his love of birding. His enthusiasm was contagious, and I found myself buying Audubon prints of the birds my father was spotting. Mounted and carefully framed, the prints brought me much joy. My father’s newfound hobby soon became my own, if only in snatches.
 
“It just takes time and attention,” my dad would say. Retired, he found he had both. The birds kept my father company. He was thrilled when a great blue heron established a nest within his view. Visiting my father, I would always hope for a glimpse. The herons were lovely and elegant. My father waited for them patiently. His patience was a gift of his retirement. During his high-powered and stress-filled career, he had no dog and no birds. But nature had called to him, and it was a call he was only able to respond to fully once he retired.
 
At age fifty-four, I moved to Manhattan. At age sixty-four, entering my own seniority, I moved to Santa Fe. I knew two people who lived in Santa Fe: Natalie Goldberg, the writing teacher, and Elberta Honstein, who raised champion Morgan horses. It could be argued that I had my two most important bases covered. I loved writing and I loved horses. In my ten years in Manhattan, I had written freely, but I didn’t ride. It was an Artist’s Way exercise that moved me to Santa Fe. I had
made a list of twenty-five things that I loved, and high on that list were sage, chamisa, juniper, magpies, red-winged blackbirds, and big skies. In short, a list of the Southwest. Nowhere on the list did New York put in an appearance. No, my loves were all Western flora and fauna: deer, coyotes, bobcats, eagles, hawks. I didn’t think about my age when I made my list, although I now realize that the move from New York to Santa Fe might be my last major move.
 
Allotting myself three days to find a place to live, I flew from New York to Santa Fe and began hunting. I made a list of everything I thought I wanted: an apartment, not a house; walking distance to restaurants and coffee shops; mountain views. The first place the Realtor showed me had every single trait on my list, and I hated it. We moved on, viewing listing after listing. Many of the rentals featured pale carpeting, and I knew from my years in Taos that such carpeting was an invitation for disaster.
 
Finally, late on my first day of hunting, my Realtor drove us to a final house.
 
“I don’t know why I’m showing you this,” she began, winding her way through a maze of dirt roads to a small adobe house with a yard strewn with toys. “A woman with four children lives here,” she apologized. I peered into the house. Toys and clothing were strewn every which way. Couches were shoved chockablock.
 
“I’ll take it,” I told my startled Realtor. The house was nestled among juniper trees. It had no mountain views. It was miles from restaurants and cafés. Yet, it shouted “home” to me. Its steep driveway would be treacherous in winter, and I sensed that I would have to become accustomed to being snowbound. But it also featured a windowed, octagonal room surrounded by trees. I knew my father would have loved this “bird room.” I made it my writing room, and I have appreciated my daily dose of aviary enlightenment every day that I have lived here.
 
I have lived in this adobe house halfway up the mountain for almost three years now, collecting books and friends. Santa Fe has proven to be hospitable. It is a town full of readers, where my work is appreciated. Often, I am recognized from my dust jacket photo. “Thank you for your books,” people say. I put my life in Santa Fe together in a painstaking way. My friendships are grounded in common interests. I myself believe creativity is a spiritual path, and my friends number many Buddhists and Wiccans among them. Every three months, I go back to Manhattan, where I teach workshops. The city feels welcoming but overwhelming. I identify myself to my students as “Julia from Santa Fe.” I love living there, I tell them, and it’s true.
 
My mail comes to a rickety mailbox at the foot of my drive. I have to force myself to open the mailbox and retrieve it. So much of what I receive is unwelcome. In March of my first year in Santa Fe, I turned sixty-five. But it was in January that my mail became infested with propaganda related to aging. Daily, I would receive notices about Medicare and special insurance targeting me as a senior. The mail felt intrusive, as if I were being watched. Just how, precisely, did the many petitioners know that I was turning sixty-five?
 
I found myself dreading my birthday. I might have felt young at heart, yet I was officially categorized as a senior. The mail went so far as to solicit my payment on a gravesite. Clearly I was not only aging, I was nearing the end of my life. Did I want my family saddled with burial costs? No, I did not.
 
The mail became a mirror that reflected me back in a harsh and unforgiving light. My laugh lines became wrinkles. My throat displayed creases. I thought of Nora Ephron’s memoir I Feel Bad About My Neck. When first I read it at sixty, I thought it was melodramatic. But that was before I felt bad about my own neck, before I turned sixty-five and became a certified elder.
 
The term “senior” officially applies to those sixty-five and older. But not everyone who is called a senior feels like a senior. And not everyone who retires is sixty-five. Some retire at fifty, some at eighty. Age is a relative thing. Most working artists never retire. As director John Cassavetes put it, “No matter how old you get, if you can keep the desire to be creative, you’re keeping the man-child alive.” Cassavetes himself was a fine example of what might be called “youthful aging.” He both acted and directed, making and attending films that reflected his own convictions. Working with an ensemble of actors that included his wife, Gena Rowlands, he told tales of intimacy and connection. As he aged, Cassavetes cast himself in his films, portraying troubled and conflicted men. His passion was palpable. Even if he played the oldest character in the movie, he was always young at heart. Taking a cue from Cassavetes, we can retain a passionate interest in life. We can throw ourselves wholeheartedly into projects. At sixty-five, we can still be vibrant beginners.
 
I’m told the median age in Santa Fe is sixty. It’s true that when I go grocery shopping I note many elders pushing carts. People retire to Santa Fe. I have almost become used to the question, “Are you still writing?” The truth is, I cannot imagine not writing. I go from project to project, always frightened by the gap in between. I catch myself distrusting my own process. No matter that I have forty-plus books to my credit, I am afraid that each book will be my last, that I will finally be stymied by age.
 
Recently, I went to talk to Barbara McCandlish, a gifted therapist.
 
“I’m sad,” I told her. “I’m afraid I’ll never write again.” “I think you’re afraid of aging,” said Barbara.
 
“I think if you write about that, you’ll find yourself writing freely again.”
 
The answer is always creativity.
 
Theater playwright Richard Nelson throws himself into new projects. His age is not an issue. One of his more recent works, the theatrical cycle The Apple Family Plays, sets an example of just what is possible with commitment.
 
Excellent writer John Bowers published his first novel, End of Story, at age sixty. At age sixty-four, he is hard at work on a second novel, longer and more ambitious than his first—and he’s quick to remark that Laura Ingalls Wilder published Little House in the Big Woods when she was sixty-four. John opened his recent book signing in Santa Fe by remarking that the bright stage lights revealed his many wrinkles. An attractive man, he carries his age lightly—despite his jokes. To my eye, his active creativity is keeping his spirit far younger than his calendar age.
 
My friend Laura, in her mid-sixties, takes strenuous classes in the dance form Zumba at her local Chicago gym. “I manage to keep up,” she says modestly. In truth, she does more than keep up. Her posture is proud and her energy is electric. “It’s just three times a week,” she tells me. But it is clearly enough to make an impact on both her physique and her optimism. Laura has always loved to dance—ever since her childhood ballet classes—and in finding an exercise routine that delights her playful and creative nature, she’s positively glowing—and exercising more consistently now than she ever has before.
 
Silver-haired but fit, Wade recently retired from a long career in academia. Well-known for his charismatic lectures in the philosophy department at his university, he still surprised himself in retirement when he felt a strong pull to take an acting class. As a young man, he had enjoyed being an active member of his local community theater. Now, he pursues acting with passion, recently undertaking the Jack Nicholson role from As Good As It Gets in the very same community theater he once haunted in his youth. “My return to the stage,” he chuckles. His excitement is palpable, and the younger members of the troupe are eager to hear his stories of days past.
 
In their retirement, both Laura and Wade saw themselves returning to passions from their youth. There is no mistake here. There are clues in all of our lives that point to what will bring us joy in our own “second act.”
 
My friend Barry, who loved to take photographs as a child on his Brownie camera, rediscovered this passion almost immediately after retiring from a long career in communication technology. He began taking photos, enjoying learning about the magic of digital cameras, and soon playing around in Photoshop to alter the images he took. He now posts his photos daily on Facebook, and they are mysterious and beautiful, sometimes capturing a more literal image, and sometimes showing a manipulated version of the original shot to convey his own unique impression, his own artist’s eye. Often he will adjust an image until it is reminiscent of a classic painting.
 
“When I was about five,” he tells me, “I would sit in my dad’s lap as we looked through Rockwell Kent’s World-Famous Paintings. He would read me the captions. We did this for several weeks, and I looked at a lot of art. It stuck with me.” When his friends remark that he has always known his calling, he is humble. “I just didn’t know that I knew it,” he says. “That’s probably true for a lot of people.”
 
As Picasso remarked, “Every child is born an artist. The trick is remaining one as an adult.” Passion, commitment, and most of all, the courage to be a beginner, are the qualities that it takes—and qualities that are well within our grasp.
 
Recently I had dinner with an artist friend. Now sixty-seven, he still works daily as a writer, radio personality, and teacher. The conversation wandered to my current writing and my musing on the subject of retirement.
 
“Artists don’t retire,” he said simply.
 
It’s true. Tom Meehan, at eighty-three, had two musicals on Broadway in one season. Today, at eighty-six, he has a new show in the works. Roman Totenberg, an esteemed violinist and teacher, taught—and performed—until his final days, well into his nineties. Frank Lloyd Wright passed on at ninety-one with an unfinished building standing in Oak Park, Illinois. B. B. King toured until six months before his death, at age eighty-nine. Oscar Hammerstein II lived until he was only sixty- five, but just long enough to see The Sound of Music open on Broadway. His final song, “Edelweiss,” was added to the show during rehearsal.
 
What do we all have to learn from this? Self-expression is something that does not—and should not—ever stop. Each of us is creative. Each of us has something unique to bring to the world. We have both time and experience on our side. Retirement is a time to tackle projects and unlock dreams, a time to revisit the past and explore the unknown. It is a time to design our future.
 
Basic Principles for Creativity Recovery
 
1.       Creativity is the natural order of life. Life is energy—pure, creative energy.
 
2.       There is an underlying, indwelling creative force infusing all of life—including ourselves.
 
3.       When we open ourselves to our creativity, we open ourselves to the creator’s creativity within us and our lives.
 
4.       We are, ourselves, creations. And we, in turn, are meant to continue creativity by being creative ourselves.
 
5.       Creativity is God’s gift to us. Using our creativity is our gift back to God.
 
6.       The refusal to be creative is self-will and is counter to our true nature.
 
7.       When we open ourselves to exploring our creativity, we open ourselves to God: good, orderly direction.
 
8.       As we open our creative channel to the creator, many gentle but powerful changes are to be expected.
 
9.       It is safe to open ourselves up to greater and greater creativity.
 
10.   Our creative dreams and yearnings come from a divine source. As we move toward our dreams, we move toward our divinity.
 
HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
 
It’s Never Too Late to Begin Again is a twelve-week course for anyone who wishes to expand his or her creativity. It is not meant only for “declared” artists. It is aimed at those transitioning into the second act of life—leaving one life behind, and heading into one yet to be created. For some, this may mean retiring from the formal work world, for others this may mean facing an empty nest once the children have grown up and left home, for still others this may simply mean rejuvenating the creative spirit when suddenly branded “senior citizen.”
 
Each week, you will read the week’s chapter and complete the tasks within. You will work with four basic tools: the daily tool of Morning Pages, the once-weekly Artist Date, and twice-weekly solo Walks. The Memoir will unfurl over the entire twelve weeks, as you revisit your unique story one manageable section at a time.
 
Twelve weeks—three months—may seem like a long time, but think of it as a few-hours-weekly investment in the next phase of your life.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

vichall
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Midlife in the title only - aimed at retirement and somehow depressing if you''re not there yet
Reviewed in the United States on September 4, 2016
I was debating repeating The Artist''s Way (which I worked through more than a decade ago), when this new book crossed my path. Excited by the synchronicity and hopeful that the author would have new exercises and insights to offer, I snapped it up and began. Four weeks in,... See more
I was debating repeating The Artist''s Way (which I worked through more than a decade ago), when this new book crossed my path. Excited by the synchronicity and hopeful that the author would have new exercises and insights to offer, I snapped it up and began. Four weeks in, I''m not so sure that I shouldn''t return to my original plan. Although "midlife" is prominent on the cover, that theme is absent in the book so far. The examples are all retirement and end-of-life, which feels a bit eery and depressing for someone with a career that actually continues into the future. So far the exercises seem predominantly repetitions - morning pages, artist dates and walking, plus memoirs- effective but nothing new. Methinks the publishers wished to expand the demand beyond the author''s clearly-intended senior audience and tagged on a misleading subtitle for extra sales. After 8 weeks, I''m putting it on the shelf to await my future retirement.
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East Coast Refugee
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
+1 to Other Reviewers: "Midlife" Content Is Light on Two Counts
Reviewed in the United States on August 28, 2016
SUMMARY: 3 stars. (1 star deducted for large amount of content derivative of Ms. Cameron''s previous _The Artist''s Way_. Another star deducted for lack of true "midlife" perspective in book, despite title.) I agree with the many reviewers who''ve written... See more
SUMMARY: 3 stars. (1 star deducted for large amount of content derivative of Ms. Cameron''s previous _The Artist''s Way_. Another star deducted for lack of true "midlife" perspective in book, despite title.)

I agree with the many reviewers who''ve written that this book is "not about midlife." While many reviewers quite rightly note that this book cleaves to Ms. Cameron''s _The Artist''s Way_ so closely that there is little room for the author to delve into the promise of the book''s subtitle -- "Discovering Creativity and Meaning at Midlife and Beyond" -- I was just as troubled to find that the "midlife" content promised in the title is all but nonexistent in the book.

To amplify, despite the book''s title, it does little to explore "midlife" -- i.e. the period that U.S. medical authorities and government agencies alike place between about age 45 and age 60 or 61 -- and instead focuses so completely on folks in their 60s and up that the inclusion of "midlife" in the book''s title is downright baffling.

When I purchased the book, I understood -- and welcomed -- the fact that the book was going to be especially germane to seniors, retirees chief among them. However, the book''s title also led me to believe that folks in true "midlife" would find themselves represented in the book''s pages too -- albeit to a lesser extent than retirees and seniors. Instead, when the book arrived yesterday, I discovered that folks within this true "midlife" demographic are scarcely mentioned in the book.

This is a bummer -- especially since wide swaths of the true "midlife" demographic are especially ripe for Ms. Cameron''s attention. For example, as economists and sociologists have noted, folks who are now in their mid- to late-50s are one of the U.S. demographics that were hardest hit by the 2008-2009 economic downturn. Such exigency has forced many of these folks to reinvent themselves professionally and personally at a time in their lives when they thought they''d be enjoying a career pinnacle and/or planning for imminent retirement. Faced with age discrimination in hiring at the same time, many of these folks have become entrepreneurs or otherwise thought outside the box about employment. Given that such reinvention and adaptation are right in Ms. Cameron''s wheelhouse, folks within the 50 to 59 portion of the aforementioned "midlife" curve could have added much to the book''s case studies. Instead, folks in their 50s are almost wholly absent from the book.

Similarly, folks in their mid- to late-40s -- i.e. the time in which folks enter into true "midlife" in earnest -- often find that either inner changes or the practical realities of job transitions, empty nests, etc. prompt the very sort of re-evaluation and re-calibration that Ms. Cameron wrote her book to acknowledge and assist. Yet -- much like their brothers and sisters in the 50-59 demographic -- folks in their mid- to late-40s are all but invisible in this book.

A book in which Ms. Cameron applies the lessons and strategies of her _The Artist''s Way_ to seniors is a focus that I applaud. Alas, Ms. Cameron muddies the waters by foregrounding "midlife" in her title so prominently that prospective buyers might reasonably expect the book to give at least cursory attention to folks in true "midlife" as medicine and government define it.

If I were a senior/retiree (I''m 45), the author''s seeming reluctance to use the words "seniors" and/or "retirees" in the book''s title would give me pause. If the final decades of one''s life ("seniors") and/or one''s retirement ("retirees") can comprise one''s most creative and fulfilling life chapter -- as I believe and as Ms. Cameron purports to believe -- then why not include "seniors" and/or "retirees" in the book''s title instead of foregrounding a younger, "midlife" demographic that comprises not even a fraction of the book''s true focus? Strange.
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L.M. KeeferTop Contributor: Cooking
5.0 out of 5 stars
A 12-Week Course in Creativity to Help You Begin Again
Reviewed in the United States on April 22, 2016
Ready to embark on your Second Act? Need a spark to get you started? In this book, creativity is the path which leads you to your next stage. This is a 12-week course in cultivating your creativity to create a more inspired and authentic life which reflects... See more
Ready to embark on your Second Act? Need a spark to get you started?

In this book, creativity is the path which leads you to your next stage. This is a 12-week course in cultivating your creativity to create a more inspired and authentic life which reflects what is meaningful and joyful for you. Although I''ve read many of Julia Cameron''s books, including her Artists Way and sequels, this book hits just right for midlife or retirement and is a refresher course with new wisdom and perspective.

You can spend a week on each chapter doing the exercises, and it will ignite new thought. Upon reading it, already I checked out universities to see about getting a master''s degree - or maybe even a doctorate - in a subject which fascinates me. I looked at my local continuing ed for dance and art classes. I''m buying a new Journal for Morning Pages and brainstorming possible Artist Dates.

The 12-week summer might be a great time to do this course, or fall when school is in the air, or January when you''re thinking about doing something different in the New Year.

Cameron writes her purpose for this book is to give readers a set of tools to "trigger creative rebirth". Cameron reminds us that Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote her first children''s book "Little House in the Big Woods" when she was 64. Many more books followed.

Some of the wisdom gleaned from this book:

* You shake the apple tree and the universe delivers oranges.

* As we open our creative channel to the Creator many gentle but powerful changes are to be expected.

* Your life is lived by tiny changes.

* The secret of your future is hidden in your daily routine.

* Our creative dreams and yearning come from a divine source. As we move toward our dreams, we move toward our divinity.

To give you a sense of topics covered in the book, some of the chapter headings include "Reigniting a Sense of: Wonder, Connection, Purpose, Honesty, Humility, Resilience, Joy, Motion, Vitality, Adventure and Faith".

This book teaches the creative principles to bring these more into your life through activities, questions to ponder and answer, wisdom and examples of others. Who doesn''t want more joy, motion, purpose, faith, connection and adventure?

This book helps you design your own creative course for yourself - almost like a summer camp or university experience. What do you want to learn about or explore that is tugging at you? This book inspires you to begin again
and seek it out.
229 people found this helpful
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Alanna
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another winner!
Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2016
I bought this book to review when I was on a 2 week vacation retreat during my 67th birthday. Although it is a 12-week process, I want to extend it and work on each chapter for more than a week. The Memoir exercise has been so insightful. Sometimes it was a painful... See more
I bought this book to review when I was on a 2 week vacation retreat during my 67th birthday. Although it is a 12-week process, I want to extend it and work on each chapter for more than a week. The Memoir exercise has been so insightful. Sometimes it was a painful process to go through a particular period of my life but in the end, I was able to understand why I have the beliefs and growth I have today and am able to ask the questions: What was important to me then and what was important to me now? How have I changed? Why are my preferences now? What kind of woman do I want to grow into? This book is a wonderful tool for self assessment and evaluation. I own all of Julia Cameron''s books and this one is another winner.
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HipThila
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic
Reviewed in the United States on April 1, 2019
I read "The Artist''s Way" in my early thirties and it saved my life. I picked this book up in chapter two of my life when I was trying to rediscover my higher purpose after retirement from my first career. It took me six months to work through the book. I went through 660... See more
I read "The Artist''s Way" in my early thirties and it saved my life. I picked this book up in chapter two of my life when I was trying to rediscover my higher purpose after retirement from my first career. It took me six months to work through the book. I went through 660 spiral pages and multiple packages of G2 pens and through this process I have found that I am indeed on the right track and have much food for fodder in my artistic endeavors. I highly encourage you to enter this process whether you are a painter, a poet, a musician, or any other creative. A plus!
11 people found this helpful
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C M Anderson
5.0 out of 5 stars
An excellent tool to finding what you want to do next in your life.
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2016
When I first read about this book, I just knew that I had to read it. I am 51 years (old/young), became disabled, and now feel retired (or put out to pasture more or less). I just sit around feeling sorry for myself and feel that life is basically over). I just became an... See more
When I first read about this book, I just knew that I had to read it. I am 51 years (old/young), became disabled, and now feel retired (or put out to pasture more or less). I just sit around feeling sorry for myself and feel that life is basically over). I just became an empty nester, also, two years ago. Then, to my amazement, the description of this book smacked me in the face and gave me the inspiration to read it. Now, I feel elated! There is so much to think about and do; starting small or slow for those of us who are scared to try something new.

Julia Cameron and Emma Lively have a very valuable goldmine here if people who are in need of beginning again, who may feel timid or don''t know how to start, can read this. I truly mean that I am elated! They have topics to write about, things to consider and things to think about. They are called
"Basic Tools For Creativity Recovery", but I call them "Jumpstarting Your True Self". There are "Taboo Subjects For The Newly Retired". Among oters that are addressed are: boredom, irritability, excitement, and even depression.

All of these are addressed to make your life ahead truly authentic and new. I did some of the exciting homework, like walking 20 minutes and letting your mind wander, journaling first thing in the morning, and answering questions about certain periods in your life. They are absolutely incredible. You should do this for twelve weeks straight. I just began for this review. It changes your life in ways you won''t even know at first. This book truly is one for the recently retired, who need to find the life that they want to live next. Plus, it is so much fun!

Thank you,Julia Cameron, Emma Lively, PENGUIN GROUP TarcherPerigee, and Netflix for giving me an ARC copy of this book to read in exchange for my honest review.
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Will inspire a lot of contemplative sessions with yourself
Reviewed in the United States on August 20, 2018
I''ve read & enjoyed a number of books by Julia Cameron and this one is no exception. Technically, I''m not finished with the book. I''ve read almost to the end, but the exercises inspired me so much I''m taking my time going through them. The book helped me... See more
I''ve read & enjoyed a number of books by Julia Cameron and this one is no exception. Technically, I''m not finished with the book. I''ve read almost to the end, but the exercises inspired me so much I''m taking my time going through them.

The book helped me re-initiate my morning pages, for one thing, which has been very helpful in prioritizing my life. Plus it got me to scroll through some decades long memories & I''ve discovered gaps in my life I want to learn mroe about.

Great book. The only stumble I had is that the title, in part, reads "midlife and beyond." It does indeed start out that way, but the bulk of the book focuses on people who actually are retired (which sadly I am not--another reason it''s taking so long to do the exercises in the book). Nevertheless, I have found it to have value for me.
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J. McL
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not for Everyone
Reviewed in the United States on August 31, 2020
Cameron too often suggests activities that cost money and activities that assume you''re able bodied - Kind of thoughtless given that this book is aimed at older folks approaching retirement, some of whom will likely have disabilities and will be on a fixed income. I... See more
Cameron too often suggests activities that cost money and activities that assume you''re able bodied - Kind of thoughtless given that this book is aimed at older folks approaching retirement, some of whom will likely have disabilities and will be on a fixed income.
I also take exception to the gender and ethnic break down of the inspirational individuals she quotes in the side bars of many pages: 84 white males, 24 white women, 6 men of color, 3 women of color. Hardly a balanced representation of creative role models. This book feels exclusive and out of touch.
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Jan Gore
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Useful
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 10, 2016
An adaptation of the Artist''s Way for the over-60s. Thought-provoking, encourages you to look back at your life and establish what you want to do next.
8 people found this helpful
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CF
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Repeat of some of previous books but useful to get sytarted in thinking and allowing ideas to ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 13, 2016
Repeat of some of previous books but useful to get sytarted in thinking and allowing ideas to appear to help with change of circumstances.
6 people found this helpful
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lesley illingworth
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
inspirational
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 5, 2016
Such a joy to read Camerons wisdom
4 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s Never Too Late!
Reviewed in Canada on April 3, 2019
Twenty-five years ago, I bought The Artist''s Way. It was amazing and I managed to follow the ideas to the end. So I am grateful for this new book with similar ideas and encouragement. The daily writing sometimes seems pointless and then there''s an insight -WOW! The...See more
Twenty-five years ago, I bought The Artist''s Way. It was amazing and I managed to follow the ideas to the end. So I am grateful for this new book with similar ideas and encouragement. The daily writing sometimes seems pointless and then there''s an insight -WOW! The consistency and routine are important - but don''t be dragged into fulfilling everything. Do what is best for you. I''m very happy to have this new book at this time. If you need a pick-me-up - you will find none better. It''s Never Too Late!
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Lizzie Dee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Inspiring
Reviewed in Germany on September 8, 2019
Julia Cameron is always inspiring. I''ve read and used The Artist''s Way and The Writer''s Way. The other day, I took my new book, It''s Never Too Late ....''down to the local cafe with me and began reading the introduction, which in itself was inspiring. I haven''t read much so...See more
Julia Cameron is always inspiring. I''ve read and used The Artist''s Way and The Writer''s Way. The other day, I took my new book, It''s Never Too Late ....''down to the local cafe with me and began reading the introduction, which in itself was inspiring. I haven''t read much so far but I did take out my notebook and pen and began writing all sorts of random things which were on my mind. Julia Cameron speaks my language. Now I just need to keep it up. The exercises seem to be similar--in fact a lot of what''s in the other books is repeated--but there''s more of a focus on the idea that it''s never too late to begin something new.
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